Month: March 2019

Leopard Brocade Coat


Hey! It’s Shams from Communing with Fabric with a project made from a stunning Britex fabric. For this project I selected a fabric from the Novelty category, Smoke Striped Leopard Smooth Brocade:


This reversible brocade leopard print from Italy is truly a stunning fabric. I wanted to make a coat and quickly settled on Butterick 6385, a Lisette pattern. I made this coat once before for my Paris wardrobe and I have loved wearing that coat.

Besides the beautiful brocade, the coat is lined with black stretch silk charmeuse, and the edges are bound with black stretch silk twill. It closes with covered snaps, though the outer coat features decorative Britex buttons.


In late October, I was headed off to a creative sewing retreat organized by Diane Ericson, Design Outside the Lines. The fall retreat that I attended, held in Ashland, featured coats as a theme. The guest co-teacher was Kathryn Brenne, who designs patterns for Vogue and has her own couture sewing school.

Kathryn encouraged me to use a variety of couture techniques, some that I hadn’t used since taking tailoring back in the 80s, and some that were new to me. For example, I made shoulder pads and sleeve heads using wool fleece, used Kathryn’s no-bulk side seam pockets, and made covered snaps (the snaps on the coat are covered with the brocade, and the snaps on the facing are covered with silk twill). I set the lining by hand, and finished the bias trim by hand.

Kathryn demonstrating her no-bulk side seam pocket using my coat.
Britex button on the left and a covered snap on the right.
Kathryn setting my sleeve or, as she calls it, “introducing the sleeve to the coat” on the mannequin…
…and on me

In my size, this coat calls for 3-1/8 yards of fabric and that doesn’t inlude extra for pattern matching. I had 3 yards and wanted to use the print symmetrically. I was able to squeeze it out by cutting each pattern piece singly—no cutting while doubled. I used both sides of the gorgeous fabric—most of the coat uses the darker side of the fabric, while the inner and outer collars, the front facings, and the back yoke use the more silvery side.



Thanks to Britex for the beautiful brocade. I purchased all other supplies.


I just returned from Japan earlier today. One of my more notable souvenirs from the trip, two shattered finger tips with a deep cut to the bone through one fingernail, makes typing a challenge. After hours in a Tokyo ER, an orthopedic surgeon stitched up my fingernail and the nail bed (where the nail is missing) using a mallet and lots of local anesthesia. Nevertheless, I made many posts to Instagram and Facebook. I probably won’t repost them here, though I may create a list of links to the relevant posts on Instagram.

Despite my mishap within one hour of landing in Japan, it was the trip of a lifetime—a complete dream. But I don’t know how soon I will be able to sew again or, indeed, type normally. (I use my right hand as normal, but I have to hunt and peck with the ring finger of my left hand.)

I am left handed, so this is particularly challenging.

I return to work tomorrow. Have a great week!

Join me on Not Dead Yet’s Visible Monday!

All About Pant Alterations

Celebrities seem to look good no matter what they’re wearing. From the red carpet to pretending to be a normal person at Starbucks, even their jeans look tailored. That’s because they are. You can spend your life looking for the perfect jeans, spending thousands on trousers, but until they’re tailored to your body, they’ll never be perfect.

From denim to suiting, twill to linen, these pant alterations are exactly what you need for a fit that’s professional, flattering, and comfortable.

DIFFERENT PANT ALTERATIONS

People change with time, and so do our clothes. Sometimes they get a little tear, sometimes you gain a little weight. Whether your jeans are too loose or your trousers too snug, knowing which alterations to use will help you preserve your favorite garments. This will also save you time and money in the long run, since you’ll know which garments are worth saving and which ones should be turned into very pretty dish towels.

WAIST ALTERATIONS

Waist Alterations are quite simple in the sense that you can either let them out or take them in. Taking in is the easier of the two, as you don’t have to worry about how much fabric is available. This can be done a multitude of ways, depending on the construction of the garment. Typically, if there are darts, you’d start there. If there aren’t darts, you can either make one or two small darts on the back or take a little in on each side seam.  You can take a pair of pants in roughly 1-2” before you need to consider an alternative alteration. With letting out, you need to take a look at how much fabric is left in the seam. You can only take a pair of pants out if there is sufficient material to do so. You would first rip the seam, carefully, with a seam ripper, and then resew it. On some pants or jeans, you can add a small piece of elastic, but this is for more casual looks and shouldn’t be applied to suit pants or trousers.

FLY REPAIR

Getting caught with your fly down is embarrassing, getting caught with a broken fly can be mortifying. It’s a simple fix, all that requires is a new zipper and a seam ripper to remove the old one.

RISE ALTERATIONS

The rise is the seam that goes from the center back of the waistband to the middle of the crotch. This is an extremely personal alteration and relates directly to your body type and personal style. The rise can hang low, medium, or high and requires recutting, so it does take some time to get this measurement just right. It’s important to note that a rise cannot be increased. You can take a rise from low to high but it doesn’t go back. To raise the rise, try on the pants and pin where it feels comfortable. Sew along the rise, and it’s done.

RECUTTING

Recutting is exactly what it sounds like, it’s basically taking the existing garment and recutting a new one from that fabric. This alteration is tricky, and can’t always be done. Similar to taking out a waist, if there isn’t enough fabric there is nothing to be done. To recut, you need to take the seams apart, measure where you want to make your cuts, and then make them! Once it’s all cut, you sew the pants back up. This is one of those times that the term “measure twice, dig once” comes into play. Once you cut this, there’s no going back, so measure twice and sew once.

TAPERING

Tapering a pant leg makes it thinner towards the ankle. This can be a flattering style and is quite in fashion, but it depends on the style of pants. Suits, in particular, should always be in proportion with itself, so a tapered pant leg might look strange with trousers of a suit. Depending on comfort and style, a tapered pant leg can look professional and clean.  To taper a pant leg, you start at the knee and take it in from there on the side seam.

HEMMING

Hemming is probably the most important of the pant alterations since it’s the most common one to be used. This trick simply raises the bottom hem of the pants, which can take a pair of slouchy looking trousers and make them professional pants. Measure how far up you need to take them up, pull them inside out and fold them up. From here, you can either use a slip stitch for a hidden hem or use a sewing machine for topstitching.

Whether you’re rejuvenating an old favorite or tailoring a new garment, these simple pant alterations will have you looking fierce and your garments looking fit. Take your rise up and your waistband in, or create something entirely new! Help your friends and family do the same with our shareable infographic, located below.

 

The post All About Pant Alterations appeared first on Mood Sewciety.

Trend Report: Pastels

From the goth girls and guys that saunter down runways with teenage angst etched on their faces, to the preppy models of Chanel who walk with grace and enthusiasm, and even the rockstar vibes exuding from certain brands, pastel is in. It has seeped into every collection, and now, it seeps into your closet. I’m not saying I’m to thank for that, but I have been a proponent of pastels from day one. Let’s take a look at which pastels should be in your palette this season.

Beige

Beige is like pastel brown, right? Either way, soybean was named a top color by Pantone this year, and they were not wrong, as beige has become the most used color on the runway. Johanna Ortiz featured a beautiful beige dress with fringe trim, ideal for heading to a tropical paradise, while Michael Kors Collection featured a beige fur coat fit for a frigid fall excursion. Moon Choi makes beige look powerful with a beige trench and matching trousers, and Nomia makes dystopian style look utopian with a utilitarian style dress in beige. Tsumori Chisato fashions a lovely beige leisure suit, perfect for spending the day doing errands, or drinking coffee while people watching.

Johanna Ortiz | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Johanna Ortiz | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Michael Kors Collection | Pre-Fall 2019

Michael Kors Collection | Pre-Fall 2019

Moon Choi | Pre-Fall 2019

Moon Choi | Pre-Fall 2019

Nomia | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Nomia | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Tsumori Chisato | Pre-Fall 2019

Tsumori Chisato | Pre-Fall 2019

Bring it on with beige:

Toulouse Beige Mercerized Cotton Voile

Toulouse Beige Mercerized Cotton Voile

Moonbeam Wavy Crinkled Velour

Moonbeam Wavy Crinkled Velour

Blue

Pastel blue is both calm and cool. Au Jour Le Jour fashions a beautiful cocktail dress in pastel blue that features fiery red fleurs-de-lis, and Calvin Luo’s skirt and sweater set in pastel blue is perfect for bringing some fire (fashion) to work in a chilly office. Fendi’s sweater dress is an absolute show stopper, and Piazza Sempione makes the drop waist look drop-dead gorgeous in a pastel blue and white floral print. I am, as we speak, drafting a blouse inspired by this Solace London shirt, made from Mood’s pleated chiffon, as it’s absolutely stunning and I need it in my wardrobe.

Au Jour Le Jour | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Au Jour Le Jour | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Calvin Luo | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Calvin Luo | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Fendi | Pre-Fall 2019

Fendi | Pre-Fall 2019

Piazza Sempione | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Piazza Sempione | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Solace London | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Solace London | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Pick out these pastel blue fabrics:

Blue Bird Printed Cotton Shirting

Blue Bird Printed Cotton Shirting

Pastel Blue Japanese Pima Cotton Lawn

Pastel Blue Japanese Pima Cotton Lawn

Green

Pastel green may make you think of Easter, but this trend transcends holidays. A Detacher fashions a looser fitting dress, while Kate Spade New York pairs pastels with pastels with a green and pink dress. Manish Arora proves there is power in pastels with a stunningly powerful pastel green dress that features a lions face on the bodice and some fierce makeup. Monique Lhuiller’s pastel green gown looks red carpet ready, although it might clash a little, and The Gigi’s pastel green blazer pairs beautifully with a burnt orange belt and brown trousers.

A Detacher | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

A Detacher | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Kate Spade New York | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Kate Spade New York | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Manish Arora | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Manish Arora | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Monique Lhuiller | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Monique Lhuiller | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

The Gigi | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

The Gigi | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Get green with these fabrics:

Sanremo Lime and Tan Two-Tone Linen Woven

Sanremo Lime and Tan Two-Tone Linen Woven

Mint Tencel Twill

Mint Tencel Twill

Pink

Pastel pink is my favorite color. Lipsticks, skirts, pants – you name it, I own it in pastel pink. Cushnie’s relaxed, asymmetrical slip dress is ravishing in pastel pink, while Frame’s overalls are ready to do some work and look cute doing it. Polo Ralph Lauren has totally validated me, since a pastel pink suit is the perfect business attire, and I have been obsessing over this Red Valentine ensemble, everything from the red tights and pink heart dress, to the stunning pink pastel coat. In the words of Andre Leon Talley, I want to hang this image in my salon. Well, my living room, I’m not that bougie… yet. Vivetta brings pastel pink into the winter months a beautiful pink coat and matching beret, made even more sophisticated with an embellished color and rabbit lapel pin.

Cushnie | Pre-Fall 2019

Cushnie | Pre-Fall 2019

Frame | Pre-Fall 2019

Frame | Pre-Fall 2019

Polo Ralph Lauren | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Polo Ralph Lauren | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Red Valentino | Pre-Fall 2019

Red Valentino | Pre-Fall 2019

Vivetta | Pre-Fall 2019

Vivetta | Pre-Fall 2019

Be pretty in (pastel) pink

Blush Baby Sequins on Mesh

Blush Baby Sequins on Mesh

Dusty Rose Stretch Ponte Knit

Dusty Rose Stretch Ponte Knit

Yellow

Pastel yellow is the color of content happiness, of peaceful power. Herve Leger fashions a beautiful crop top with off the shoulder sleeves and crossed straps,  while Off-White works it out in pastel yellow. Piazza Sempione’s summer suiting is perfect for dinner by the beach, and Telfar shows us that even men can get on the pastel trend with a lovely button up and sharp collar. Tome uses layers to allow this simple shirt to pop, perfect for heading to work or dressing up for a night out.

Herve Leger | Pre-Fall 2019

Herve Leger | Pre-Fall 2019

Off-White | Pre-Fall 2019

Off-White | Pre-Fall 2019

Piazza Sempione | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Piazza Sempione | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Telfar | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Telfar | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Tome | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Tome | Spring 2019 Ready-to-Wear

Shine bright with these fabrics:

Mellow Yellow Accordion Pleated Chiffon

Mellow Yellow Accordion Pleated Chiffon

Sanremo Goldenrod and White Two-Tone Linen Woven

Sanremo Goldenrod and White Two-Tone Linen Woven

You already know I’m wearing this trend until the end, but how do you feel about pastels? Let me know in the comments!

 

The post Trend Report: Pastels appeared first on Mood Sewciety.

Burda Anorak Jacket

Hey, there! I hope 2018 has been kind to you, so far! 2018 has had its rough edges, at least for me, but let’s not dwell on that.

Today I have a spring jacket to share. Elliott Berman Textiles gave me this beautiful reversible jacquard last November. It arrived just before I left for Japan and I loved it, but then I fell and rolled, backwards, down an escalator in Tokyo within an hour of landing. The resulting injury to my dominant (left) hand has slowed my sewing output.

After deliberating, I decided I wanted to use a Burda anorak pattern. I downloaded it from the Burda site, but I gather it’s from the September 2014 issue of their magazine, if you have that.

Unfortunately, Elliott Berman has sold out of this fabric, but they have other brocades and jacquards.

I’ve made a lot of changes to the pattern, but it’s been awhile, so let me see if I can remember all of them…

  • The pattern is from their collegiate collection and is sized in “tall” sizes. I’m not used to their tall sizing, but went with it anyway. I ended up using the original length for my size. I could have shortened the armhole, which is long, but I didn’t. I really like the large, 3-piece sleeve that reminds me of the 80s.
  • I didn’t need to add width to the pattern, so I did a vertical-only FBA.
  • I eliminated the elastic sleeve hem. I left the sleeve long so I could fold it back and show off the Petersham ribbon hem.
  • I hemmed the entire jacket with Petersham ribbon, in two colors. I originally bought 5 yards in a plum shade, but ran out. I went back and bought another 1-2 yards (I can’t remember exactly) but I neglected to bring a sample of the original ribbon, so this time I got a more purple color. I decided to use it anyway, as I liked using both colors. I hand sewed the ribbon, which means I sewed 12-14 yards by hand, since I hand sewed each edge.
  • I omitted the drawstring at the hem.
  • The pattern calls for 4 yards of fabric, and I had 2.5, so I had to be judicious. I omitted the back shield.
  • Instead of the 3 pockets from the original pattern, I made two front patch pockets finished with Petersham ribbon.
  • The hood was supposed to be finished with a narrow trim from the same fabric, but this curved shape takes a lot of fabric, so I replaced with a plum-colors cotton stretch velveteen.
  • I harvested the beautiful selvedge from the fabric and inserted it into the upper sleeve seam.
  • I lined the (unlined) hood. By the way, I like this hood as a collar, but not so much as a hood.
  • I added shoulder pads, covered with the lining.
  • I replaced the zipper with 3 buttons. I sewed the very last bit of Petersham ribbon on each side of the buttonholes.
  • This pattern is quite boxy. I narrowed the side seam, at the waist, by 1/2″, for a total removal of 2″. I also added two 3/8″ tucks in the back at the waist, removing another 1-1/2″. I left it boxy, but not too boxy.

And now, for some pics!

Harvesting selvedge. When a selvedge is nice, I harvest it even if I’m not sure that I’ll use it.
Sewing the selvedge into the sleeve
The selvedge is a bit uneven, but I let it be.
Spring has been glorious here in San Francisco
I used the last bit of Petersham by sewing it on either side of the 3 buttonholes.
I usually don’t bother covering shoulder pads, but I’ve been in a slow-sewing mode!
Once I finished covering the shoulder pads, I had to cut some of them off, or they would have peeked outside the neckline. I guess my shoulders are narrow. Patterns certainly seem to indicate that I have narrow shoulders, as I’m always narrowing them, though I didn’t in this pattern. I decided to go with the wider shoulder, as part of the boxy look.)
The 3-piece hood. I trimmed with some stretch velveteen and lined with Ambiance.
I enjoy finding backdrops with different textures
Hand sewing
Covering the hood seam
And more hand sewing. Lots more.
Fabulous earrings by Pam Neri.
(I buy from her right off Instagram. See something you like on her feed? Message her!)
I bought this fringed leather purse for DD1 in Florence last spring, but she didn’t want it.
Taking in the side seams at the waist.
Thanks, Elliott Berman, for the fabric!
I paid for all other supplies.


Misc

These days I want to blog projects, but not travel or other activities. You can follow me on Instagram to see my current hijinks. You don’t have to join Instagram, unless you want to leave comments.

Here are a few miscellaneous pics, and one video.

I was recently in Venice Beach, CA for DartConf 2018, a Dart language conference that I helped organize. Actually, my primary contribution was producing swag for the event. I had so much fun getting a plushie made. I gave a brief talk, introducing him at the conference. Meet Dash! (If you want to hear my voice, it’s a 2-minute video…)
Loving Dash!
I’m proudest of the first ribbon, “Chief Plushie Officer”!
Since I never posted about Christmas, here are a few pics. I took my daughters to the Claremont Hotel and Spa in the Berkeley Hills. We were upgraded to the presidential suite. It was pretty sweet!
Christmas morning
Love these munchkins!
Visiting Twin Peaks on Christmas afternoon
Taking a selfie
Too bright to see the screen. LOL
Christmas view from the Presidential suite
Christmas morning
Visiting Britex a couple days after Christmas
A recently purchased outfit that I’m enjoying. The vest is from Simply Bella (she may have more in stock – if interested, give her a call). I purchased the pants in Venice Beach, when I visited in January.
People often ask about my fingers, so I took this pic this morning, exactly 104 days after the accident. I am using them, though the nail on the pointer finger is growing in with a split down the middle. I really miss my fingernails! Without them, it’s almost impossible to pick up pins and needles.

What’s next for me? I have an upcoming sewing retreat, a trip to London, and lots of deadlines at work! It will be pretty busy between now and Google I/O, in May.

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Mesh Vogue Top and Catching Up (Let’s Try Again…)

Try #4. When I originally posted this last Sunday (7/22), I had already replaced each of the 30 photos at least 3 times, but it was still no bueno, so I took the post down until I had time to deal with it. I managed to figure out how to post a single pic again, and it has changed since I last posted. The number of hoops I have to jump through to post a single pic makes it rather time consuming.

Here we go again!


Well, HELLO, Possums! (Yes, I have watched Dame Edna rather recently.)

I hope you know you can follow me on Instagram or Facebook, because I don’t want anyone to accuse me of disappearing. I am blogging less—this is true—but it’s also true that, in the last 6 months, I’ve sewn exactly one garment for myself.

At least I’m wearing the heck out of it.

This will be a long-ish, picture-heavy, post. 🙂

My new sewing machine

My beloved Bernina 930 (my mother’s machine from 1985), suffered an extreme failure early last April as I was 1″ from the end of the last seam on DD2’s bathingsuit. My 930 had been getting cantankerous lately, so I bit the bullet and purchased a gorgeous new machine, a Bernina B740. (I bought it from The Sewing Machine Shop in Walnut Creek, and was very happy with the experience.)

I have never, in my life, paid that much for a machine (at least not unless it carried me around), but she’s a beauty. I brought her home, set her in my entryway, and left her to gather dust until the retreat. I had no time or energy for sewing, or learning a new machine.

Girded for Sewing Machine Shopping
Yes, I’m even wearing my scissor socks
Triumphant!
Welcome home! (Now sit and collect dust for awhile…)
I started learning how to use her on the retreat. Thank goodness that Ann Smith was there, because this is very similar to her machine, and she taught me a lot!
Ann, working on a Kantha cloth jacket, using Kantha cloth purchased off the bolt

P.S. I did have my Bernina 930 repaired, by the way. I just can’t let it go!


Vogue 9305, a Knit Mesh Top

I first saw Vogue 9305 when it was released in early Spring 2018, I think, and I was smitten. I LOVED this top. LOVED. I ordered the pattern when it was on sale and then, of course, didn’t sew it up right away. The one garment I have sewn (and completed) for myself in 2018—I started it at the retreat, and finished at home soon after. (There was quite a bit of hand sewing, of course, the way I like it.)

(P.S. I lie. On the retreat I also sewed a pair of pants. All but the waistband. They are still awaiting the waistband and I know I’ll love them, and wear the heck out of them, so there’s no excuse.) Vogue 9305

I used a crinkled knit mesh. I can’t remember where I bought it (oh, do I miss my steel-trap memory!), but I think it was from Satin Moon (on Clement Street), just before they closed. Of course, I made a few changes to the pattern:

  • This top is designed for a woven, but I used a knit.
  • The neckline was too high. I asked Ann to draw in a better neckline, so I omitted the back slit.
  • I added width at the bust (but no FBA), that I later removed, and then I removed more.
  • I made the armhole a bit smaller.
  • Of course, I envisioned this as a floaty top, so I left the shoulder seam unsewn from the tip of the shoulder to the bottom edge. I also left the side seams unsewn from the waist to the hem. (Some of my retreat pals thought I was nuts, by the way.)
  • On the side of the front with the drape, where the slit begins, the fabric poked out from my bust, so I made some gathers just under the bust to tame it.
  • When finished, the top was still a bit big, so I took gathers on the sides, right at bust level. I liked the resulting look much better.
  • I hand sewed all outside edges which, of course, I made much longer by not fully sewing all the seams.
  • I recollect that the neckline was supposed to be turned under and stitched. This is a heinous finish. I made a tiny hem with a 1″-wide length of fabric cut on the cross grain.

When I wore this top to the next gathering of my retreat pals, it received many enthusiastic compliments, so maybe I wasn’t so crazy, after all. 😉 I’ve worn this a lot. When it’s cool, I wear a black tee underneath. Otherwise, I just wear a black tank.

It’s a chilly morning, in the low 50s, so I’m wearing a black turtleneck underneath
Warmer weather, so no turtleneck

(P.S. More pics of this top in the next section.)


Mother’s Day (but really more pics of the top)

I wore this top to celebrate Mother’s Day with my eldest. My youngest is meditating on a mountain top for 6 months, so that celebration is delayed.

DD1 and I got our favorite sub sandwiches, and then we headed off to Lands End, where I took pics of her and visa versa, and we talked and talked and talked.

Lands End, overlooking the Pacific Ocean
I love this “Where’s Waldo” pic she took of me
Climbing a tree on Mother’s Day is a perfect activity
Though a gazebo is more my speed
I wear this top with baggy pants (shown here) and slim leggings and I like it both ways
Closeup of my Sally Bass necklace


Misc

What else have I been up to in the last 7 months? Here’s a quick summary.

  • Had some very unpleasant work stress early in the year.
  • That stress is over, but I’m still dealing with regular work stress—there’s so much to do! (When my boss suggests that maybe I do less, I hiss at him. I’m feeling challenged and having fun.)
  • I’m leading the writing team for my project, all two of us.
  • I’m driving a website re-design.
  • I’m managing the content schedule, another writer’s work, and driving a bunch of other stuff.
  • I’m working on creating more swag. I looove working on team and product swag!
  • I’m planning some trips for late 2018 and 2019.
  • I’ve been toying with some fabric designs.
  • I started a second version of this same Vogue top, but haven’t finished it.
  • I started a new sewing project and I have no idea how it is going to turn out, but I’m excited by it.
  • I’ve been meeting up with sewing buddies. In fact, today I met up with Ann, Diane, and Patti F. me, Diane, Ann, and Patti F
    Ann wearing her Tremont Jacket (a Sewing Workshop pattern), made from an ikat fabric
  • One of my sewing groups, the one I joined back before I was married, is compiling a book of our collective sewing stories. I wrote two stories for the book, then I helped others get theirs written and/or edited. It’s a huge project, but it’s going to be great when finished.
  • I’ve been dealing with health-related issues (some rather unpleasant), as well as some depression/anxiety, and the final healing of my damaged finger.
  • My 20-year-old cat disappeared and presumably died.
  • I took two amazing classes on paper and fabric marbling. I am looking forward to doing more of that. One day.
  • I traveled to London, Seattle, and two spring sewing retreats.
  • Gave up my DirecTv satellite service, and binge watched a lot of shows on Netflix and Amazon Prime. (I really enjoy the savings!)
  • Spent a lot of time sleeping.
  • Spent a lot of time thinking. Just thinking.

Enjoying my (two) stacked Juinhui London bracelets and my Sally Bass jet black glass ring

Hopefully you’ll see a bit more of me over here. I’m really itching to sew, but my time is even more limited these days. Now that my energy is returning somewhat, it’s more feasible.

Have a great week!

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