Month: November 2019

Mood Presents: The Patchwork Collection – Free Sewing Patterns

Backpacking through Europe, you stop in a Spanish cafe. The scent of strong coffee wafts, fogging the windows on a rainy afternoon. You lean back in your seat and flip through postcards, memories of Prague and Paris drifting in and out. The sturdy sateen skirt you wear has accompanied you through your travels;  in Amsterdam as the sun set gently on the river; where you sat by the water in Venice sipping wine and contemplating art for art’s sake! And soon, at the bazaars of Morocco, flitting between stalls filled with well-seasoned delicacies and delicate scarves. Paired with a simple t-shirt and a denim jacket, your patchwork-printed skirt fit in beautifully at Irish taverns and British pubs, while your lacy peasant blouse made it appropriate for brunch by the Seine and quiet conversations with new friends in ancient places. From cigarette pants to boatneck blouses, allow patchwork prints to help you blend in and stand out, whether you’re just down the road or far from home. 

Traditionally, patchwork is a form of needlework where small swatches or patches of fabric are sewn together to create a new design. Although it typically involves solid pieces of fabric, fashion has a way of livening things up. Today, paisley and polka dot become one, along with stripes, animal print, chevron, and, well, just about every other print to have existed. Create your own by picking your favorite prints and meticulously stitching them together, or let Mood do the work with patchwork prints! Fashion light spring bomber jackets with patchwork print, or folksy pinafore skirts. Use patchy fabrics for summer shorts, or warm up this winter with patchwork printed blouses. 

The Yarrow Dress

Shavonne sports The Yarrow Dress in an eclectic patchwork that twists, turns, and blooms on a creamy surface. Rustic and romantic, this gorgeous garment features rich reds and oranges bursting with energy, a color palette seen on streets in every fashion capital. The Yarrow Dress’s flounce sleeves and ruffled neckline are prominent in the Victorian styles that have also taken the runway by storm. Pair this ostentatious outfit with kitten heels and tights for a ladylike look, or split the dress in two for a crop top and skirt set! Check out Mood’s splicing of the Yarrow and Zenobia Dresses for another take on this terrific trend.

free dress sewing pattern

The Aster Pants

Brittany sports The Aster Pants in a DIY’ed patchwork print made from two Mood Exclusive prints sewn together. Stripes will never go out of style, and with a floral overlay, it truly represents the pattern play trend that has been ever-present on the runway. Slimming and sinuous, this spectacular style can be paired with a variety of garments. Throw on the D’arcy Bralette for summer festival looks, or the Iris Ensemble bodysuit in velour for crisp fall mornings. Check out the Onella Blouse in a powerful pink for professionally funky attire, or the Lyonia Shirt for a night on the town!

The Nyssa Dress

Courtney sports The Nyssa Dress in a warm patchwork print. Fluttering in the breeze, this folksy fashion flows from the body beautifully. Hitting both the wrap dress  trend, and the stylish high-low skirt, this lovely dress is ideal for showing off your curves. Whether you’re heading to the park for a picnic, or into the city for brunch, all it takes is a simple accessories switch for this dress to fit in anywhere. Check out Mood’s Adonis Accessories free sewing pattern and use the stunning corset belt to really cinch that waist!

Loving the garments but wishing the patchwork would just pick one print? Create the Yarrow Dress in a solid color for a basic statement, or utilize paisley to fashion a powerful Nyssa Dress. Would you like to leave these garments on the rack, but love the patchwork trend? Fashion the Palm Jumpsuit for an overall style that coincides with the Pinafore Collection, or the Spruce Dress for a cinched silhouette! 

How will you be using the Patchwork Collection? Let us know in the comments, and use #MadeWithMood so we can keep up with your closet!

The post Mood Presents: The Patchwork Collection – Free Sewing Patterns appeared first on Mood Sewciety.

Angel-Wing Chambray-and-Lace Top & GIVEAWAY!!!

Contents:


Angel-Wing Chambray-and-Lace Top

A few months ago Mood Fabrics seduced me in that way they do. I had purchased some denim and they sent me one of those “you may also like…” emails. It featured this Denim and Ivory Novelty Cotton Lace, and I was smitten. This fabric is a bit misnamed: it is not denim. It is a cotton chambray, but it is denim colored. 🙂

I purchased 2 yards. I rarely buy or wear lace, but I have been focusing on hot-weather clothing (for Florence and NYC this summer) and this was just.so.pretty!

I played with the fabric and quickly decided that I wanted to use the lace vertically, rather than horizontally. (I posted these pics to Instagram and Facebook and most people thought I should use the fabric horizontally, but I didn’t like it as well when held up to my body.)

I quickly decided I wanted a simple angel-wing-style top. I didn’t bother with a pattern, so I started with a tape measure. The fabric is 60″ from selvedge to selvedge, or 58″ if you ignore the lace peaks. I measured from wrist to wrist and my wingspan is 52″.

What… you don’t tape your tape measure to your body?

That means I needed to remove at least 6″ from the width. I didn’t want to cut the lace, or mess with the lace at all, so I had to remove the extra fabric from the section between the lace. That section is 16″ wide. To complicate matters, I didn’t want to remove width in the area where I would have a neck opening, and I needed about 10″ for the neck hole, so I had to remove 3″ on each side of the neck opening (or 6″ total). I sewed the tucks so that they would end above the bust—they release above the bust, providing my full bust adjustment (FBA).

Sheesh, I didn’t have a lot of room because, as it was, I had only 3″ on each side of the neck opening. So I decided to take 1/2″ tucks, directly on top of each other, at each side of the neck opening. This required careful marking, sewing, pressing, and topstitching.

Next, I drew a standard round neckline opening, but it was too small for my head. I added a slit. It now went over my head, but I didn’t want a slit, so I turned the slit into a v-neck. (A boat neck would have been easier, but I avoid boat necks – I don’t like them on my frame and, anyway, I didn’t have enough width for a boat neck once the tucks were sewn in.)

I used a scrap of fabric to make a neckline facing.

I wanted to place the hem on a lace “valley”. The valleys occur every 4-1/4″, so I experimented pinning the hem at different lengths, but always landing on one of the valleys. I even tried a hi-low hem, but I ended up choosing a longer hem that was the same front and back. I thread basted the hem.

Thread basting
I hemmed the chambray portions by machine and the lace portions by hand

I finished the top by strategically tacking the front to the back at the side bust and side waist. I also tacked a pleat into the front, below the bust, to control the volume a bit.

Twirling
This top was made from a rectangle and has no shoulder or side seams. I used a 60″ by 69″ rectangle, plus some tucks and tacks for shaping and taming the fullness.

Do I like this top? I think so. I made it specifically for hot weather and wore it over a cream tank top for these pics at 7am this morning. I was freezing, so I take that as a good sign, as far as hot weather goes. I wore it over a sweater for a local arts festival today and it is fun to wear with those lacy wings. I can’t wear a sweater or jacket over it, and I put my cross-body purse under it, which maybe wasn’t the best look, but I didn’t want to carry a satchel. I doubt I’ll take it to Florence, because the cotton has a tendency to wrinkle, but I think it will be a cool and fun wear on a hot day!


Style ’17 & Giveaway

Last year I blogged about Style ’16. The Style show provides a great opportunity to buy gorgeous wearable art and jewelry directly from the artists. I love events like this! I made sure to get Style ’17 on my calendar many months ago—April 29th and 30th. This year the event will be held at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View—walking distance from where I work one or two days each week.

Then, last week, one of the co-producers of Style ’17 kindly reached out and offered me two free tickets. I bought my ticket months ago, so I asked if I could offer the tickets to my blog readers. She agreed, so, if you would like two free tickets to this fabulous event, please leave a comment indicating your interest! I will post the winner next weekend, so you have until Friday to enter.

For those who don’t win, you can still save! They offered my blog readers 40% off the ticket price, so it will cost $6 instead of $10. (To be honest, I don’t mind paying full price for this event because it benefits Art in Action, a national non-profit that provides visual arts curriculum to 75,000 students each year, including children in 185 Bay Area schools.)

To get the ticket discount, enter SHAMS40 on the last page of the checkout. If you do come and you see me, please say hi! In short… a fun day at the Computer Museum, great shopping, benefitting arts programs—it’s a win-win-win!

(By the way, two of my artist-friends have booths at this event. Winnie of Eccentric Designs jewelry, and wearable artist Carol Lee Shanks, who sometimes teaches at Design Outside the Lines.)


Can you believe it’s April already? My weekend calendar is becoming uncomfortably full. Things are heating in my History of Italian Fashion class. In fact, we are each giving a presentation while in Italy and I’ve selected my subject. I am giving a short preso on designer Antonio Marras. Mr Marras has been designing for Kenzo since 2005 and he also has his own line—his designs are quite compelling. I plan to visit his high-concept store while in Milan this summer. I hadn’t heard his name before, but it was instant love when I googled his designs. You might check out his Fall 2017 line.

I’ve just washed the fabric for my next Britex project, and I’ve selected a pattern, so that’s my activity for next weekend.

Please join me on Patti’s Visible Monday. I hope you have a great week!

Angel-Wing Chambray-and-Lace Top & GIVEAWAY!!!

Contents:


Angel-Wing Chambray-and-Lace Top

A few months ago Mood Fabrics seduced me in that way they do. I had purchased some denim and they sent me one of those “you may also like…” emails. It featured this Denim and Ivory Novelty Cotton Lace, and I was smitten. This fabric is a bit misnamed: it is not denim. It is a cotton chambray, but it is denim colored. 🙂

I purchased 2 yards. I rarely buy or wear lace, but I have been focusing on hot-weather clothing (for Florence and NYC this summer) and this was just.so.pretty!

I played with the fabric and quickly decided that I wanted to use the lace vertically, rather than horizontally. (I posted these pics to Instagram and Facebook and most people thought I should use the fabric horizontally, but I didn’t like it as well when held up to my body.)

I quickly decided I wanted a simple angel-wing-style top. I didn’t bother with a pattern, so I started with a tape measure. The fabric is 60″ from selvedge to selvedge, or 58″ if you ignore the lace peaks. I measured from wrist to wrist and my wingspan is 52″.

What… you don’t tape your tape measure to your body?

That means I needed to remove at least 6″ from the width. I didn’t want to cut the lace, or mess with the lace at all, so I had to remove the extra fabric from the section between the lace. That section is 16″ wide. To complicate matters, I didn’t want to remove width in the area where I would have a neck opening, and I needed about 10″ for the neck hole, so I had to remove 3″ on each side of the neck opening (or 6″ total). I sewed the tucks so that they would end above the bust—they release above the bust, providing my full bust adjustment (FBA).

Sheesh, I didn’t have a lot of room because, as it was, I had only 3″ on each side of the neck opening. So I decided to take 1/2″ tucks, directly on top of each other, at each side of the neck opening. This required careful marking, sewing, pressing, and topstitching.

Next, I drew a standard round neckline opening, but it was too small for my head. I added a slit. It now went over my head, but I didn’t want a slit, so I turned the slit into a v-neck. (A boat neck would have been easier, but I avoid boat necks – I don’t like them on my frame and, anyway, I didn’t have enough width for a boat neck once the tucks were sewn in.)

I used a scrap of fabric to make a neckline facing.

I wanted to place the hem on a lace “valley”. The valleys occur every 4-1/4″, so I experimented pinning the hem at different lengths, but always landing on one of the valleys. I even tried a hi-low hem, but I ended up choosing a longer hem that was the same front and back. I thread basted the hem.

Thread basting
I hemmed the chambray portions by machine and the lace portions by hand

I finished the top by strategically tacking the front to the back at the side bust and side waist. I also tacked a pleat into the front, below the bust, to control the volume a bit.

Twirling
This top was made from a rectangle and has no shoulder or side seams. I used a 60″ by 69″ rectangle, plus some tucks and tacks for shaping and taming the fullness.

Do I like this top? I think so. I made it specifically for hot weather and wore it over a cream tank top for these pics at 7am this morning. I was freezing, so I take that as a good sign, as far as hot weather goes. I wore it over a sweater for a local arts festival today and it is fun to wear with those lacy wings. I can’t wear a sweater or jacket over it, and I put my cross-body purse under it, which maybe wasn’t the best look, but I didn’t want to carry a satchel. I doubt I’ll take it to Florence, because the cotton has a tendency to wrinkle, but I think it will be a cool and fun wear on a hot day!


Style ’17 & Giveaway

Last year I blogged about Style ’16. The Style show provides a great opportunity to buy gorgeous wearable art and jewelry directly from the artists. I love events like this! I made sure to get Style ’17 on my calendar many months ago—April 29th and 30th. This year the event will be held at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View—walking distance from where I work one or two days each week.

Then, last week, one of the co-producers of Style ’17 kindly reached out and offered me two free tickets. I bought my ticket months ago, so I asked if I could offer the tickets to my blog readers. She agreed, so, if you would like two free tickets to this fabulous event, please leave a comment indicating your interest! I will post the winner next weekend, so you have until Friday to enter.

For those who don’t win, you can still save! They offered my blog readers 40% off the ticket price, so it will cost $6 instead of $10. (To be honest, I don’t mind paying full price for this event because it benefits Art in Action, a national non-profit that provides visual arts curriculum to 75,000 students each year, including children in 185 Bay Area schools.)

To get the ticket discount, enter SHAMS40 on the last page of the checkout. If you do come and you see me, please say hi! In short… a fun day at the Computer Museum, great shopping, benefitting arts programs—it’s a win-win-win!

(By the way, two of my artist-friends have booths at this event. Winnie of Eccentric Designs jewelry, and wearable artist Carol Lee Shanks, who sometimes teaches at Design Outside the Lines.)


Can you believe it’s April already? My weekend calendar is becoming uncomfortably full. Things are heating in my History of Italian Fashion class. In fact, we are each giving a presentation while in Italy and I’ve selected my subject. I am giving a short preso on designer Antonio Marras. Mr Marras has been designing for Kenzo since 2005 and he also has his own line—his designs are quite compelling. I plan to visit his high-concept store while in Milan this summer. I hadn’t heard his name before, but it was instant love when I googled his designs. You might check out his Fall 2017 line.

I’ve just washed the fabric for my next Britex project, and I’ve selected a pattern, so that’s my activity for next weekend.

Please join me on Patti’s Visible Monday. I hope you have a great week!

freelance fancies

i’ve been working from home for the past two and a half years, ever since i moved to manchester and went fully freelance to combine work on both my blog and my business and design a lifestyle that truly works for me.

having the freedom to work as you choose is most people’s dream, however it’s not without its drawbacks. once i stopped working in an office and started working from a desk in the corner of my living room, i quickly realised that working from home isn’t always the simple idyll it’s cracked up to be. you need to become incredibly disciplined to stay productive and motivated when you work for yourself, by yourself, in your own space, on your own schedule. there are so many possible distractions, from the pile of washing up in the sink to the latest episode of the good place on netflix, and making sure you stay on track and accountable to your goals can be tricky.

over the past 30 months i’ve really honed my working week to make the most of both my time and productivity style, and thought i’d share a few tips i’ve learnt along the way. the most important thing to remember is that everyone works differently and has their own strengths and skill-set, so not all of these tips will resonate for you. the key thing is to find your own best way of working outside of the shackles of the corporate 9 to 5 and experiment with new ways of working to help you thrive and establish a working lifestyle that works for you. 

goal setting & time blocking

when it comes to goal setting i’m the first to admit i’m always up in my head about what i want to achieve long-term and rarely commit my heart and my mind to a long-term vision of how i want my business to be. i think part of the appeal to me about being a freelancer is the freedom to pick and choose, considering any options and opportunities that come your way. i’m not going to preach this approach as a good way to successfully grow and develop a multi-million pound business (far from it!) but for me it is the way i’ve been able to build a life that has worked, so far, for me.

i prefer far more specific and bite-size goals i feel able to commit to on a weekly or monthly basis, and have a running to-do list that only ever seems to grow, despite the number of things i check off each day. i manage this by placing specific emphasis on each task i’ve listed, from the ones that absolutely have to be done that day, to the ones it would be good to get checked off, to the ones i’d like to be able to incorporate if possible. as i say, this list grows and evolves over time, with some things falling by the wayside if i’ve left them too long and the idea feels stale, and others growing in relevance and importance over time and becoming a priority.

time blocking doesn’t work for everyone (or every task) but it’s the way i find works best for me to be able to tackle my task list successfully. it’s a simple concept; i allocate as a set time period to a task and block this out on my calendar, either on a monthly, weekly or daily basis, depending upon the task. for client work i generally have 4-hour morning or afternoon blocks allocated to specific clients on a weekly/monthly basis and set the tasks i plan to work on that week within this slot. my clients know when they can expect me to  be working on their projects and when is best to schedule in meetings or calls for catch-ups. everything else, from writing blog posts and scheduling social content, to styling and photography, then gets allocated a time slot around these client blocks.

1. photo ledge 2. desk 3. cushion 4. artwork 5. desk chair 6. heater/fan 7. blanket 8. shelving 9. drawers

setting the scene

when i first moved to the fab flat, one of the things i was most excited about was moving my desk out of my bedroom and into its own dedicated space in the living room. it made a huge difference to my productivity levels not having my desk right next to my bed, but a few years on i can tell that i’d really benefit from having my office in a totally separate room in the flat, away from the distractions of the open-plan kitchen to my left, and sofa behind me. in an ideal world i would love to have a totally standalone office at the bottom of my (currently fictional) garden – wouldn’t that be the dream?!

i love the look of summer house 24‘s luxurious log cabins and already have a pretty good idea on how i’d like to decorate it to create the perfect office/photo studio to work from every day, even in winter months. i think there’s something about having to step outdoors and ‘commute’ to work, even if it is just a few steps down a garden path, that helps you get in the right frame of mind to be productive and motivated. having that kind of delineation between work and home space is becoming more and more of a priority for me – hopefully one day soon i’ll be able to make it a reality!

i think it goes without saying that if you enjoy your workspace, you’re going to be more productive. where you work should be a space that makes you feel empowered and motivated. i think it’s really important to remove anything from the space that doesn’t spark joy (think piles of bills or stacks of unpaid invoices – grr!), and instead bring in a few biophilic elements such as potted houseplants or a scented candle, to help reduce your stress levels and boost productivity and creativity. anything in your workspace that connects you to the natural world can help facilitate effortless concentration when your direct focus on a task begins to wane. taking just a few minutes to connect with a pet, gaze out onto the garden or focus on the flicker of a candle can help your mind to free associate, and make those important leaps in understanding that too much focused attention can inhibit.

ditching the 9 to 5

many studies show that the average worker is more productive when they take regular breaks. i know that after an intense period of work my mind is prone to wandering aimlessly and whatever work i do when i’m in this phase of distraction is sub-par at best. we’ve all been conditioned by the traditional 9 to 5 model of working that we only need to take a lunch break in the middle of the day, but i find myself far more able to focus on the task at hand when i allow my state of mind to guide me. if i’m feeling super focused i tend to get tunnel vision and hours can pass in the blink-of-an-eye whilst i work on the task at hand. at other times i can sense that my brain is only up to the task of working successfully for short bursts, and have learnt that i need to allow myself to take breaks in between to refresh and recharge; put the kettle on, do the dishes, start a laundry load or go for a walk round the quays.

a piece of advice i was given once that i find works well on days when i feel particularly unfocused, is to work for as long as my laptop retains charge i.e. start the day with a fully charged device, work until the battery indicator begins to flash, then step away from your laptop whilst it charges up to full power again. i like the analogy here, of your own personal battery being drained by work in the same way as your laptop, and both taking time out to fully recharge again. this way of working doesn’t work for everyone – nor is it necessarily practical to work this way every day – but it’s definitely a way of working i find useful once in a while. i also find it useful to schedule in a couple of working days per month outside of my office; not just decamping to a coffee shop with my laptop but instead taking a full day out for creative inspiration. i might visit a new city as part of prep for a city guide, visit a museum or gallery to see what creative vision it might spark, or spend time visiting all my favourite interiors stores looking for new brands, trends and angles to cover.

being sociable!

if you work from your own home you can sometimes go days without leaving the house, and if you live on your own as well you can sometimes go days without speaking to another human being! loneliness can be a real issue if you’re a freelance worker, but i promise you you’re not alone. there are so many people working on their own these days that support networks are popping up all over the place, and with a little bit of proactive networking you’re likely to find a local community of freelancers who regularly meet up to support one another with co-working sessions and other regular meet-ups, especially if you live in even a semi-urbanised area.

if you live in a more isolated location and fear you won’t find anyone to connect with locally who is in the same boat, don’t overlook the power of social media and video chat services to connect you to other like-minded souls. i’ve a couple of fellow freelance pals who i regularly have a friday coffee and a chat with virtually, skyping into one another’s living rooms for an hour or so and having a catch up about anything and everything. just because we’re not physically in the same room doesn’t mean we don’t feel connected and supported during that time, and throughout the week we keep the conversation going in a freelancer’s whatsapp group we use to brainstorm ideas and sense-check each other’s work. it can feel daunting getting the ball rolling with something like this, but if there is someone you find yourself chatting with regularly on twitter or instagram i’d really recommend reaching out and seeing if they’d be open to a video chat. chances are they will leap at the chance! if you’re too scared to make the first move in such a direct way, why not put the idea out to your followers in a tweet or insta-story and see if anyone bites? i’d suggest you’re likely to find your social calendar filling up in no time!

do you have any top tips for how to work productively as a freelancer? i’d love to hear your recommendations in the comments below!


this post is in partnership with summerhouse24, but all thoughts and opinions expressed are my own. all photography, excluding moodboard product imagery, © fabricofmylife. 

The post freelance fancies appeared first on fabric of my life | UK interior design, lifestyle & travel blog.

Made by a Fabricista: Cape

The temps in the south have finally cooled down and I have began to sew some fall/winter items like this cape! I love capes and find them great for chilly weather that don’t quite call for a coat. McCalls 7477 has been on my “to sew” list for years and I’m so glad I finally whipped it up. The pattern itself is a quick and straightforward sew and this wool really sewed up nicely.

I chose this 100% wool suiting mainly because I loved the checkerboard weave. Additionally it was a listed as a medium weight which was perfect for this cape as it was heavy enough to create some warmth yet still light enough to have some drape. There are still a few yards left so grab yours quickly! here If you love the checkerboard weave also see this heavier coating. I also love this houndstooth suiting. Or just check out ALL the suitings as there are several great options.

The only issue you may have with this fabric is fraying due to the loose weave, to prevent this I simply serged the raw edges before construction. If you don’t have a serger, the zig-sag or overlock stitch on your machine will do the same things. Fraycheck is also an option.

The fusible interfacing I used for the collar and facing bonded smoothly to the wool, though I suggest interfacing both inner and outer collar for more structure. Another suggestion is to under stitch the collar to prevent it from rolling on the top edge. I’m not sure why the instructions skip this step.

Although sold out, I’ll mention that these extra large gold snaps are also from Fabric Mart so don’t forget to check out the Buttons and Findings section before checking out with your fabric purchase as there are some real gems there.

Although some hand stitching was required along the collar and the belt opening, McCalls 7477 sewed up quickly and easily. This cape can also be worn with a store bought belt or be worn beltless. 

I am not a fan of cold weather, but I must admit I love sewing coats, capes and jackets. Which do you prefer; capes or coats?

See you next month,

Tiffany
TipStitched

How to Design Gift Tags With Procreate and Spoonflower

How to Design Gift Tags with Procreate and Spoonflower | Spoonflower Blog

From furoshiki to custom gift tags, this holiday season we’re letting our presents do the talking. Our secret weapon this year? A swatch of Peel and Stick Wallpaper! Using her go-to design app Procreate, Spoonflower’s graphic designer Alexis is making a visit to the blog to show how she’s personalizing her presents with custom gift tags for the holidays. Whether you download the free template* and make it all your own or follow along step-by-step using Alexis’ festive icons, the only limit is your imagination. Did we mention you can fit 46 labels on a $7.50 swatch of Peel and Stick Wallpaper. That’s just $0.16 a label — happy holidays to you!

*Gift tag template for personal use only.

How to Design Gift Tags with Procreate and Spoonflower | Spoonflower Blog
Gift tag template for personal use only.

No time to design your own gift tags? Shop the Marketplace for gift tag designs by the Spoonflower community.

How to Design Gift Tags with Procreate and Spoonflower | Spoonflower Blog  | Spoonflower Blog
A sneak peek of Alexis’ design process!

Part 1: Download the Gift Tag Template

From your iPad download the gift tag template files. In this folder you’ll find two Procreate files and one Photoshop file*.

To open the gift tag templates in Procreate:

1. Tap on the file.
2. Tap on the three dots in the upper right hand corner.
3. Tap “Open In”.
4. Select “Copy to Procreate” from the list of apps, you may have to scroll through the list to find it.

5. Procreate will automatically import and open the file in the app.
6. Exit Procreate and open the folder link again and repeat the process for the remaining Procreate file.
7. Both files should now be in Procreate.

*The Photoshop file is included in case you don’t have an iPad and want to use a computer to make the tags.

Part 2: Set Up Your Procreate File

There are multiple sticker sheet options. To keep all of the stickers available for use again, I suggest making a duplicate of the WovenGiftTags-Templates file so you always have a complete file to reference.

1. To duplicate the file, make sure you’ve closed it and are in the gallery view. If you are in the file, tap on “Gallery” in the top left corner, from here swipe your finger to the left over the file and you’ll see three options: Share, Duplicate and Delete. Tap “Duplicate” and it’ll create a copy of the file.

2. Open the newly duplicated file. Tap on the layers icon in the top right corner of the Procreate app interface. In the layer panel you’ll see there are 6 folders:

  • Assorted Tags* (pictured above)
  • Big Rectangular Tags
  • Circular Tags
  • Hang Tags
  • Small Rectangular Tags
  • Square Tags
We’ll be using the assorted tags version pictured here for this tutorial.

3. Determine which of the templates you want to use and delete the other layers you don’t need. To delete a group, go to the layers panel and swipe to the left on a group and tap “delete”. For our example we’ll be using the Assorted Tags layer with a few of each of the sticker types.

Part 3: Customize the Gift Tags

At this point you can go about customizing the tags in one of two ways:

  1. Use your own illustrations and drawings.
  2. Use the icon set provided in the files linked at the top of this post.

To illustrate your own gift tags:

1. Create a new layer by opening the layers panel in the top right of the file and click the plus sign in the top right corner.
2. Illustrate whatever you’d like on top of each sticker.
3. To add text, tap on the action menu in the top left (wrench icon), locate the “Add” button and tap “Add Text” from here you can customize your greetings.

Illustrate your own gift tags | Spoonflower Blog

To use the icon set provided:

1. Navigate to the Icon_Set file and using three fingers swipe down on the canvas. This will bring up a panel with the option to Cut, Copy, Copy All, Cut & Paste or Copy & Paste the icons.
2. Select the “Copy” option.

Add the icons to your gift tags | Spoonflower Blog

3. Once the icon layer has been copied, exit the file and navigate to the duplicated WovenGiftTags-Templates you created earlier and open it. 

4. Once on the template file, swipe down on the canvas with three fingers and this time select “Paste”. The copied layer from the icons set file will be put onto its own layer in the tag template file.

Add the icons to your gift tags | Spoonflower Blog

5. Now we’re going to begin selecting different icons to place on each of the stickers. We’ll start with customizing the circular stickers first. For this process tap the selection tool (ribbon icon) in the top menu bar and use your finger or Apple Pencil to draw around whatever element you want to add to your sticker. We’re going to select the wreath icon, so draw a circle all the way around the wreath and when coming back to the beginning, tap on the grey circle to complete the selection.

Add the icons to your gift tags | Spoonflower Blog

6. Once the element is fully selected you’ll see grey diagonal lines outside of your selection. Swipe down with three fingers and select “Cut & Paste” to simultaneously cut your selection from the icon layer and paste it onto a new layer.

Add the icons to your gift tags | Spoonflower Blog

7. Tap on the move tool (arrow icon) while on the new layer where the wreath has been pasted and drag it on top of one of the circular stickers. If needed, resize the wreath by dragging in or out from a corner to make the element bigger or smaller.When it’s in the spot you want and at the size you want, tap on the move tool again to confirm the transformation.

Add the icons to your gift tags | Spoonflower Blog

8. To add “To” and “From” text, go ahead and select the color you want your text to be from the color palette in the top right corner of the screen. You can always change it later if needed, but I find it easier to pick it beforehand. Add text by tapping on the action menu (wrench icon) and under the “Add” button, select “Add Text”. This will create a new text layer.

Add text to your gift tags | Spoonflower Blog

9. Now you’ll see a text box pop up with a keyboard. Type out whatever greeting you’d like and then click “Edit Style” in the top right corner of the keyboard. This will reveal a panel where you can customize the font, style, size, alignment and other attributes. I’m using Courier Regular at 20pt.

Add text to your gift tags | Spoonflower Blog
I started out at 35pt font but it was too big so I dragged the bar to the left to make it smaller and settled on 20pt font size instead.

10. Once you’re happy with the way your text looks and you’ve customized it how you want tap “Done” or anywhere else on the canvas to hide the keyboard and deselect your text box.

11. Tap the move tool again to resize and reposition your text box as needed on your sticker. Once that’s done, we’ll want to group the layers (the wreath and text layers) to keep things organized. Open up the layers panel and tap on one of the layers. Next, swipe to the right on the other layers you want in the group—they should all be highlighted—and tap “Group” at the top right of the layers panel.

Add text to your gift tags | Spoonflower Blog

12. Now from here you can either repeat this process and customize the next sticker using a different icon or you can duplicate the group you’ve just created to make all the circular stickers look the same, which is what I’m going to do. With the new group selected swipe to the right and tap “Duplicate”.

Customize the text | Spoonflower Blog

13. Use the move tool to drag the new duplicated group to the next blank sticker, making sure “Magnetics” is activated under your move tool settings to it keeps the elements aligned as you’re repositioning it.

Add text to your gift tags | Spoonflower Blog

Repeat this process of duplicating the groups until you have all the circle stickers complete.

Other Methods of Customization

I follow the process above for each of the other sticker shapes, but there are some additional ways you can customize and add some fun flair to make your gift tags uniquely yours!

1. Change the Sticker Background Color

If you want to change the color of a sticker so it’s not plain white, you can! In the layers panel tap on the layer with all the tag shapes. Duplicate the layer so you can always access the original if needed (swipe to the right on the layer and tap “Duplicate”). Go into your colors panel on the top right corner of the interface and select whatever color you want for the background color of your sticker. Next, tap and hold on the circle color icon and drag from there to whatever sticker you want to fill with a background color and lift your finger from the screen. This will drop that color onto that shape and fill it with that color.

See how to change the sticker background color on your gift tag.

2. Add Background Elements

To make a background that fits inside the sticker like the example below, follow these steps.

Add background elements to your gift tag | Spoonflower Blog

Make a new layer directly above the template layer with all the sticker shapes on it. Pick a color and brush, draw a line or whatever element you want to add on top of the sticker while on the new layer. Once that’s done go back to the layers panel and double tap (tap twice quickly) on that layer to bring up an options panel and select “Clipping Mask”. This will clip the drawing we’ve just made to the shapes on the layer below. In my case I went over a little bit and it’s visible on the sticker next to it, so I went back to erase it.

See how to add background elements to your gift tag.

Pro(create) Tip: Trying to make a perfectly straight line? When you’re drawing a line, don’t lift up your Apple Pencil (or finger) when you get to the end. Hold it for a second and it’ll snap and allow you to drag the end point wherever you want. When it’s in the place you want, simply lift your pencil to place it.

3. Add a Border or Frame

For a border or frame, make sure your sticker template is duplicated and then create a new layer, pick a brush & color and draw a border shape on the new layer. Fill it in by dragging the color from the color panel to the shape. Then open the layers panel and clicking on the image of the new layer select “Clipping Mask” from the option menu. Now you have a fun border that you can add icons or text to the center of!

Add a border to your gift tags | Spoonflower Blog

You can also get extra fancy with your frames and add more decoration. I like doing adding masks to my border layers so that if I change my mind I can always remove it without destroying the original shape. To try it, go back to your layers panel and click on the image of your border layer to open the option menu and select “Mask”, this will add a new layer that is tied to that layer. Make sure you’re on the new layer mask and switch your brush color to pure black. With masks you’ll use black and white; black hides and white reveals. Now you can draw on your mask layer and it’ll hide parts of the border. In my case I made some stripes. But if I decide I don’t like that at a later point, I can always turn off or delete the mask and the original shape will be there. It’s a great tool for trying new things you’re not sure you want to commit to yet!

See how to add a border or frame to your gift tags.

Part 4: Upload to Spoonflower

Once your gift tags are complete, it’s time to upload to Spoonflower!

1. Save your gift tag file as a JPG. In the Actions menu (wrench icon) tap “Share” and then “JPEG” from here you can choose where to save it
I typically AirDrop it to my computer, but you can also tap “Save Image” to save it directly to your camera roll and upload directly to Spoonflower right from your iPad.
2. Login to your Spoonflower account and upload your file.
3. To create adhesive gift tags, you’ll want to order your design on a 2′ x 1′ swatch of Spoonflower’s Peel and Stick Removable Woven Wallpaper.
4. Once you receive your swatch of wallpaper, cut out and stick your labels onto beautifully wrapped presents!

Looking for more unique ways to jazz up gift wrapping this season? Try out these six gift wrapping techniques inspired by Furoshiki.

6 Ways to Wrap a Gift with Furoshiki | Spoonflower Blog

sublime sounds

one thing i’ve come to realise having lived alone for a couple of years is just how important a role music – and sound in general – plays in my life.

i’m someone who has always appreciated the peace and harmony of silence but when you experience too much of it, silence can become isolating. i don’t think i’ve ever had my stereo on as much as i do now that i live on my own, and a huge reason for that is the reassuring comfort that background noise, chatter and melody bring to my otherwise deafeningly quiet home. up until now i’ve been streaming music through the tinny speakers of my bluetooth vinyl player but earlier this month ikea asked if i would work with them on their aw19 connected home trend. as part of the trend, they sent me a couple of their new symfonisk bookshelf speakers, created in collaboration with audio-experts sonos, and let me tell you, they are a total game changer!

designed to democratise the home sound system, these stylish wifi speakers fit seamlessly into the home to enhance everyday life and integrate with the sonos system app. when my boyfriend first pointed them out to me in store, all eager and excited for us to acquire them when we moved in together, i had to admit it was the first time i’d ever been seduced by the sleek aesthetics of a speaker system. the symfonisk bookshelf speaker, which is approximately the size of two hardback books, marries ikea’s design knowledge with sonos’ expertise in sound and technology to create a product neither brand would have envisioned alone, perfectly placed to delight the technophile (him) and appease the décor addict (me). 

this partnership has always been about our two companies’ shared passion, values and knowledge. ikea and sonos recognize the importance of great sound and its potential to positively affect life at home. ~ tad toulis, vp of design sonos

as much as i’ve always been fairly pro technology in the home, finding smart products that successfully combine form and function has always been a bit of a stumbling block for me, so it’s great to see ikea now forging ahead in the market and creating great products that not only tick both the style and substance boxes, but also the affordability box too. of course affordability is totally subjective, but personally i feel that £99 for a collaboration between two prestigious brands creates a fantastic entry level into the speaker market. while i’ve been able to add a couple of these speakers to my home – one in the living room and one in the bedroom – you only really need one in a small flat to truly enjoy the benefits of great-sounding music throughout.

available in either black or white, the bookshelf speaker really is a ‘put-anywhere’ device and has been built with the perfect dimensions for ikea’s kallax storage range, with hooks and brackets available to turn it into an actual bookshelf which would be perfect to use by the bedside. you can ever hang it from a rail in a metod kitchen cabinet! when i experimented with styling it in my home i found it really was a hugely versatile piece and am totally torn between whether it looks better lying flat – and almost invisible – atop the stockholm 2017 rattan cabinet in the living room, or as a bookend in my bedroom atop my malm chest of drawers

our goal is for our collective work to save space, get rid of cables, make clutter invisible, and bring sound and music into the home in a more beautiful way. ~ björn block  / business leader for ikea home smart at ikea of sweden

the connected home trend is a significant trend for aw19 at ikea. as technology becomes more and more integrated in our homes, smart products that are stylish, functional and innovative are helping make life around the home that little bit easier by creating an interconnected hub that caters to our every need and desire. i love being able to simultaneously control the music i play in my living room and bedroom from an app on my phone, and am excited by some of the other smart home products ikea have recently unveiled which i’d love to incorporate someday. my current rental home has weird light fittings which mean i’m unable to make use of their latest smart lighting solutions (although i love the rechargeable portable värmer led light i’ve added to my bedside table), but i’m definitely seduced by their new range of smart blinds, which can be controlled using a remote or the ikea smart home app – pretty cool, huh? imagine waking up each morning and at a touch of a button being able to open your blinds and let the light flood in and naturally aid your wake-up, whilst streaming a ‘rise and shine’ playlist through your bedroom speaker. sounds like a pretty ideal way to wake up to me!

i’ve definitely started to appreciate the psychological benefits of listening to music a lot more lately, and not just as an aid for my morning routine. there was a time when i needed near silence to be able to concentrate on writing succinctly, but since starting to work from home i’ve found that the background noise of a calming instrumental playlist helps improve my cognitive focus and allows me to successfully work for longer periods of time without my mind wandering. during my work breaks and at the end of the day i’ve found myself popping on an upbeat soundtrack to encourage me to get moving and unwind after hours of being sat behind my desk. music therapy is widely acknowledged to be beneficial in reducing depression and anxiety, and i certainly find that the moment a peppy upbeat song comes on my mood often lifts and the rhythmic beat of a track gets me bopping along – and shaking out the stress of the day – in no time.

in the evening i’ve been trying to refrain from automatically popping the television on for company, and instead alternate my weeknight patterns so i have more of a varied routine. i might listen to a podcast whilst cooking and eating dinner, listen to a music show whilst soaking in the tub, or pop on a soothing jazz playlist whilst curling up with a good book on the sofa. i certainly think that varying my routine is helping me to stay motivated and more engaged as the nights draw in, when my natural instinct is simply to give in and get myself ready for bed at 9pm!

who are your favourite bands and artists, and have you created any fantastic playlists you use either for work or play? i’ve linked a few of my current favourites above, but would love to hear your recommendations – let me know in the comments.. 🙂


this post is in partnership with ikea, who provided gifted product for the purpose of this shoot. fabric of my life is a 2019 ikea ambassador.

luis leiva 

The post sublime sounds appeared first on fabric of my life | UK interior design, lifestyle & travel blog.

Made by a Fabricista: Bright Red for Fall

Hello Fabricista’s!  I hope that the change of seasons has inspired you to sew lately.  I always love the onset of fall since it is my favorite season.  Although it is still very hot in Georgia I am hoping that a cool down is just around the corner.  For my post this month I was hoping to branch out of my typical silhouette and sew something exciting and different.  I wanted to sew a pattern that had interesting details with a fabric that was easy to handle and so I settled on Simplicity 8791 with this bright red seersucker.  This top really stands out in my closet since I don’t have anything with sleeves like it.  While I can say that it is definitely a deviation from my usual style I am still somewhat undecided about it.

First of all the fit was challenging, I ended up moving the dart around and shortening the length.  I also added a snap to the center front to battle the deep gaping.  The dart turned out fair but the added snap pulls the front together in a way that the top doesn’t appreciate.

Secondly I could not decide on what to pair it with.  I ended up sewing two new skirts to see if it would translate well into my work wardrobe. 

This beautiful floral skirt is Pamela’s Favorite Bias Skirt made up in a vintage rayon from my stash.  This is a great little pattern.  I love a great maxi skirt and this one is loose and comfortable.  I really want to make another since they are SO easy to sew up- there’s ONE pattern piece.  I am loving florals this fall and have been searching for something perfect to pair with this vintage rayon so this top definitely fits into my formula.  
  

The second skirt is Simplicity 8175 which Marica also recently made.  I have had this animal print sateen from Fabric Mart for a while and it makes a great skirt to pair with my new top.

Every now and then I like to try a pattern that is outside of my norm and although I’ve had some difficulty with the fit of this one I’m still happy to put it into my wardrobe rotation.  I hope your sewing is as challenging and fun as mine sometimes is and I hope that if you venture out of your normal wheel house that you’ll be rewarded with a beautiful garment.

Elizabeth

How to Elevate Your Basics with Trims & Appliques

Whether you call it upcycling or repurposing, I’m going to show you how to breathe life back into your basic wardrobe favorites! I’m not affraid to admit that I tend to hold on to some items longer than I should. We all have that one pair of jeans stuffed in the back of the dresser drawer that we don’t wear but refuse to get rid of! What about that one tee shirt that you wish had a little “something, something” to help  add some spice to your look? Well, with a little trim and appliques, you can upgrade just about anything! Let’s have some fun with a little DIY project sure to get your creative juices flowing! What basics are you planning to upgrade?

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Basic Tee

Trim, appliques, DIY, Update, Upcycle, DIY Tutorial

A basic blank tee shirt can be the perfect canvas for adding trim and appliques. Try to look for inpiration to help guide you through your creative process. Here’s how I took this simple black tee, and made it into a one-of-a-kind exclusive piece.

  1. After choosing my trim and appliques, I played around with a few different layouts before stitching anything down.
  2. Once I decided on a layout, I used a fabric marking pen to trace my desgn to indicate where I wanted everything to go.
  3. I use a little quick dry Tacky glue to hold some of my trim in place until I was able to hand stitch it down.

Trim, appliques, DIY, Update, Upcycle, DIY Tutorial

Purchase Materials Used Below:

Distressed Jeans

Trim, appliques, DIY, Update, Upcycle, DIY Tutorial

Distressed jeans have quickly made their way into the wardobe staples category. Everyone should own a good pair of distressed jeans! Jeans can be very pricey depending on the brand. The damaged and distressed look can hike up the price tage even more! Here’s how you can distress your own jeans and look like a rockstark without the hefty designer pricetag!

  1. First, fold your cardboard and insert it in the pant leg where you would like to make the distressed rips.
  2. Use your rotary cutter to make small slashings in the jeans.
  3. Use either a tweezer or straight pin to gently pull threads from the slashed opening to fray the outside edges.
  4. Keep fraying until your desired distressed look is achieved.
  5. Hand stitch a stunning mesh trim to the opening of the distressed areas. Include a chain detail for a one-of-a-kind look.

Trim, appliques, DIY, Update, Upcycle, DIY Tutorial

Purchase Materials Used Below:

Additional items needed:

  • Pair of jeans
  • Cardboard
  • Needle and thread

Solid Backpack

Trim, appliques, DIY, Update, Upcycle, DIY Tutorial

No outfit wouldn’t be complete without a matching bag! Try adding some trim and appliques to your solid backpack or purse to bring your look to the next level! Here are a few quick and easy tips to help you get started.

  • Make you you have a clean solid space to work with.
  • Plan out your layout before gluing or stitching anything dow.
  • Once you have you design maped out, glue trim, appliques, or patches to your bag and let the glue dry.
  • After everything has dried, you can now go in and hand stitch your appliques to your bag for a more permanent result.

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Additional items needed:

What items are you looking to show some love to? We’d love to hear your ideas on how you use trim and appliques to elevate your look!

The post How to Elevate Your Basics with Trims & Appliques appeared first on Mood Sewciety.

Made by a Fabricista: Cozy Wool Stripes

The more I sew with wool, the more I love it.  It presses so well, it’s easy to sew, and when the weather turns cooler, it has you covered!  I’ve been slowly adding more and more wool into my wardrobe from base layer tees, more scarves than I care to admit to, and even some wool workout gear.  This year’s goal was to make some wool garments for my lower half.
See, I’ve been terrified of doing just that for years because of my husband’s uncanny ability to shrink all my wool.  It’s so wonderful to have a hubby who helps with the laundry, but being a set it and forget it person, and me being a little careless myself with where I put my laundry, there have been more wool sacrificed to the washer than have lasted.  The last skirt I lost hurt–a navy one with swishy vintage lines that I had worked so hard to fit *perfectly* to me.  Until it got eaten in the wash.  I ugly cried over that one.  But this time, I’m determined!  As God is my witness, I’ll never shrink a skirt again!
That giant intro aside, for this month’s project, I turned to a favorite skirt pattern: Burda World of Fashion (pre Burdastyle!) 2-2007-113.  This is my 3rd time making this skirt.  I’ve previously made it in linen and also cotton double gauze.  I love the bias panels set into the skirt body.   The bias gives a lot of flow to the skirt and also some visual movement in the stripes of this cream and tan viscose/wool crepe.
I wear a lot of creams in cooler months, so I had plenty to pair it with including this fun asymmetric sweater I found at a consignment shop.  I need to fit the sweater a little for me, and I’d love to add a zipper to it’s big cowl, but I love the idea of the opposing stripes together.
This skirt comes together really quick with the exception of the hem.  Those 4 bias panels make a level skirt a little dicey.  This was my first time using the combination of my dress form and a vintage hem marker.  
I let the skirt hang for a day after making it to let the bias settle.  The yellow poly lining is cut on the bias too per the pattern, so I gave it a chance to hang as well.  
My dress form is a little less hippy than I am, so I had to anchor the skirt with pins so it was level before I started marking.  I will always use this method going forward though.  With the hem marker it took me about 10 minutes to add pins to the right length for my skirt.  Sure enough, the bias panels had dipped down further and were about 1/2″ longer than the straight grain portions of the skirt.  I then hand basted along the pin lines and used my thread as a pressing guide.  I basted my basted just to double check before cutting anything.  To my amazement, I had a respectably level skirt!
I’ve made skirts with bias bits before and gone through all sorts of acrobatics/monkey business to get a nice level hem.  I see now why people love those old hem markers!  They’re such a good tool!
I also paired it with one of my favorite tees.  It’s a supima cotton tee I refashioned from a RTW tee.  There’s a hummingbird applique that I added with some geometric stitching.  I often use this as a layering tee, so it’s nice to have a wardrobe buddy for it to wear on its own! 
When I had finished cutting everything I had one long strip running parallel to the selvage.  As I noted, I really dig wool scarves.  Colorado is cold and when it’s not particularly cold in spring/fall/winter, it is often windy.  A scarf is such a lifesaver of a garment for keeping me from turning into a little popsicle!
Bonus–because my very weird remnant of fabric was running along the selvage, I was able to cut a scarf that would make excellent fringe on the edges.  Fringe on cross grain edges is never quite as nice looking.  The wool fringed really easily, and I topped off each edge with some free form yoyos.
They’re a little different than circle yoyos.  I cut these from strips of the leftover fabric at whatever angle was available to me.  I gathered the top edge, then overlapped the edges to form a circle.  Because there’s just one layer of fabric, they’re a little less bulky than a traditional yoyo where the circle turns into basically a little drawstring bag in on itself when you gather the center.  
So that’s how I’ll be keeping warmer in the cool months.  Now I’ll just have to keep my skirt away from laundry doom!
How do you keep your wool garments from getting tossed in the wash?

Until next time!
~Elizabeth from Elizabeth Made This
Sew something creative